3 NATURAL PSORIASIS REMEDIES FOR YOUR SKIN - Glow Bar London

September 05, 2022 6 min read

3 NATURAL PSORIASIS REMEDIES FOR YOUR SKIN

Psoriasis is a common skin condition causing inflammation, redness, and itching, and which many use CBD to manage. Besides CBD, you can use three natural remedies, aloe vera, salt baths, and healthy weight, to reduce and manage the symptoms of psoriasis.

Many people have psoriasis, a common skin condition resulting in painful skin rashes. It also causes itching and redness, which may come repeatedly. Although the cause of psoriasis remains unknown, studies relate it to poor immunity and unhealthy weight. As the hype and demand for CBD increase, people use the cannabinoid for just about anything, including psoriasis, and the cannabinoid promises to manage the symptoms, as this article shows. It also reveals the three natural remedies for this condition, including aloe vera, salt baths, and keeping a healthy weight.

Understanding CBD

Since the passing of the Farm Bill in 2018 to legalize the consumption of hemp with less than 0.3% THC, CBD has become part of the mainstream, and major industries are tapping into it and making it part of their ingredient lists. Thus, there is a greater need to know CBD than ever. According to Mascal et al. (2019), CBD is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis plants, majorly extracted from hemp. The active compounds in cannabis plants are called cannabinoids, and there are more than 100 in nature. CBD stands out for being non-psychoactive, showing that it can result in the expected feedback without making you feel high.

Types of CBD

Are you after CBD for the many health benefits people link to it? You must know the types of CBD you can explore. There are three formulations or types of CBD, none of which is better than the other. You can enjoy almost every CBD product in the following three formulations;

  1. Full-spectrum CBD; is the most sought CBD form. It has CBD, THC, and additional cannabinoids, for which people run for it. Still, you must avoid it if you take drug tests occasionally lest you will fail the tests.
  2. Broad-spectrum CBD; is more like full-spectrum CBD in composition but does not have THC. It is great for users who want to enjoy CBD with additional compounds.
  • Isolate CBD is the purest form of CBD, featuring the cannabinoid and no other compounds.

Can CBD Help With Psoriasis and Other Skin Conditions?

Watt & Karl (2017) reported CBD as therapeutic, and many want to tap into this therapy. In fact, there are many such claims that people almost take CBD as the answer for every health challenge out there. Can CBD help with psoriasis? First, it is worth noting that redness, itchiness, and rashes are the common symptoms of this condition. According to Hammell et al. (2016), CBD can help fight inflammation that leads to rashes. As such, CBD forms the key ingredients in any topicals people take to manage psoriasis. Schuelert & McDougall (2011) made the same observation and also found CBD great for pain. The rashes and itching come with pain, revealing that if CBD can help with pain, it would be great for psoriasis. Still, it is worth noting that the FDA does not look at CBD as a medication for psoriasis, and more research is needed to prove that the cannabinoid would even be helpful. That said, there are at least three remedies that studies have found useful for psoriasis and other skin conditions, as shown later in this article.

CBD Products for Psoriasis

As the hype around what CBD can do increases, more people are concerned about the cannabinoid. Do you have psoriasis and would like to use CBD to manage it? Many use CBD topicals for skin conditions like psoriasis. You can apply CBD cream, balms, patches, or skin oil to manage the rashes and itching from psoriasis. Besides, people take CBD products claimed to help with inflammation. These could be anything from gummies to tinctures to capsules, but the topicals are the most effective as far as skin conditions are concerned. If you doubt the potential of CBD to help with psoriasis, you can go to the following three alternatives, which research backs up to help with psoriasis.

Salt Baths

The thought of using salt baths to manage skin conditions like psoriasis is not new since salt baths have been on the market for the longest time. People have been using the Dead Sea salt for skin conditions, but other salts are also in the picture. What is it with salt baths that would help you manage the rashes, itchiness, and redness that come with psoriasis? Basically, the salts are packed with nutrients and minerals, including magnesium, that the body needs for almost every physiological process. According to Halevya et al. (1997), salt baths are great for the skin. People use them for rashes, itchiness, redness in psoriasis, and other skin problems.

Aloe Vera

Do you dread using salt baths for psoriasis? You could try aloe vera as a better alternative. Many have signed up for it and find it helpful for itching, scaling, and reddening of the skin, and others are looking up to it as a remedy for psoriasis. You can find aloe vera in health food stores in fresh and dried forms, both having health benefits you want to tap into to manage psoriasis. According to Paulsen et al. (2005), aloe vera helped people with psoriasis manage the symptoms of the condition. This is a double-blinded study seeing potential in aloe vera helping with psoriasis, although other studies reveal otherwise. The Nation Psoriasis Foundation supports using aloe vera to manage psoriasis but recommends that one proceeds with caution.

Healthy Weight

According to Setty et al. (2007), too much weight can increase the risk of one suffering from psoriasis and cause severe symptoms for those who already suffer from this condition. Thus, too much weight is a risk factor for psoriasis. Studies like Naldi et al. (2013) reported that reducing your weight would lower your risk for psoriasis and help you manage the symptoms you already have to deal with. That said, more research is needed to show how fast weight reduction can remedy the condition.

Conclusion

Psoriasis is a skin condition resulting in rashes on the skin, redness, and itchiness. It is thought to result from low immunity and worsened by cold and high weight. Since CBD promises to help with pain and inflammation, people use CBD products, mostly topicals, to manage skin conditions like psoriasis. However, there are insufficient studies to prove CBD's efficacy for this. Still, there are three remedies you would like to try to manage psoriasis naturally. Reducing your weight is key, and honey and salt baths go a long way to help you.

References

Halevy, S., Giryes, H., Friger, M., & Sukenik, S. (1997). Dead sea bath salt for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris: a double-blind controlled study. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 9(3), 237-242.

Paulsen, E., Korsholm, L., & Brandrup, F. (2005). A double‐blind, placebo‐controlled study of a commercial Aloe vera gel in the treatment of slight to moderate psoriasis vulgaris. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 19(3), 326-331.

Setty, A. R., Curhan, G., & Choi, H. K. (2007). Obesity, waist circumference, weight change, and the risk of psoriasis in women: Nurses' Health Study II. Archives of internal medicine, 167(15), 1670-1675.

Schuelert, N., & McDougall, J. J. (2011). The abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602 reduces nociception in a rat model of acute arthritis via the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55. Neuroscience letters, 500(1), 72–76.

Mascal, M., Hafezi, N., Wang, D., Hu, Y., Serra, G., Dallas, M. L., & Spencer, J. P. (2019). Synthetic, non-intoxicating 8, 9-dihydrocannabidiol for the mitigation of seizures. Scientific reports, 9(1), 1-6.

Watt, G., & Karl, T. (2017). In vivo evidence for therapeutic properties of cannabidiol (CBD) for Alzheimer's disease. Frontiers in pharmacology, 8, 20.

Hammell, D. C., Zhang, L. P., Ma, F., Abshire, S. M., McIlwrath, S. L., Stinchcomb, A. L., & Westlund, K. N. (2016). Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis. European journal of pain (London, England), 20(6), 936–948.

Naldi, L., Conti, A., Cazzaniga, S., Patrizi, A., Pazzaglia, M., Lanzoni, A., ... & Psoriasis Emilia Romagna Study Group. (2014). Diet and physical exercise in psoriasis: a randomized controlled trial. British Journal of Dermatology, 170(3), 634-642.