CBD Soap Recipes to Try at Home - Glow Bar London
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  • September 05, 2022 5 min read

    CBD Soap Recipes to Try at Home

    CBD is a compound derived from the cannabis and hemp plant. The hype around it is increasing since the cannabis-derived compound offers different therapeutic and medical impacts on the body. This article will focus on CBD soap recipes you can try locally.

    CBD is formulated in many ways, including skin care products such as creams, salves, lotions, and soaps. Most of these products are manufactured by different companies, making it necessary for any user to consider the product's manufacturer since they determine the quality of the product. Other users' reviews are good if you purchase the product from online stores. However, you can make CBD products, including soaps, from the comfort of your home. They are the best since you can regulate your products; choose ingredients that suit your skin type.

    CBD Soap: What Is It?

    CBD soap has an additional ingredient known as cannabidiol. CBD is a hemp-extracted compound widely used due to its therapeutic and medical-associated effects. According to Überall (2020),  CBD can relieve various forms of pain, including nerve pain and acute and chronic pains. CBD on its own cannot cause a 'high' feeling. According to Watt & Karl (2017), THC is a popular marijuana compound with a psychoactive effect on the user. Although CBD and THC are derived from the same plants, they differ in their functioning; for example, CBD activates the cannabinoid receptors in the body for general well-being.

    CBD soaps are designed to be used on the skin's surface. Different types of CBD can be infused in the soap, for example, full spectrum, broad spectrum, and CBD isolates. The full spectrum CBD contains all the compounds found in the plant, including traces of THC. However, most topical CBD products do not take this form of CBD, but they can be traces of the THC and thus cannot affect your mental state. Broad spectrum CBD contains different components from the plant, for example, terpenes, flavonoids, and all cannabinoids except THC. On the other hand, CBD isolate is commonly known as pure CBD since it does not contain any additional compound from the plant.

    Research shows that full spectrum and broad-spectrum CBD have more effects since the effects increase with the dosage, unlike CBD isolate, whose effect is stagnant. According to Pamplona et al. (2018), full-spectrum and broad-spectrum CBD exhibit the entourage effects, and therefore the cannabinoids and essential compounds found in hemp work synergically to dispense various therapeutic effects.

    How to Use CBD Soap

    Just like the regular ones, CBD soaps are used when taking a shower, but the difference is that the additional compound enhances the soap's cleansing effects. With the use of CBD soap, you can benefit from its anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and analgesic effects.

    How CBD Soap Works

    The human body contains cannabinoid receptors in the skin, brain, and nerves. Therefore, CBD soap is among the topical products, and thus they interact with the endocannabinoid system by activating the CB1 and CB2 receptors in the skin. The effect is not limited to the skin, but the compound can penetrate through the skin deep to the nerves and thus significantly impact the whole body.

     Using Home-Made CBD Soap: Here Are Some of the Things to Keep in Mind

     The Quality of CBD Oil

    This is an essential factor when selecting CBD oil for your recipe. This will call for thorough research on different brands for you to choose the best high-quality CBD oil to have a reliable product that can serve your needs. To know the quality of CBD oil, you can look at the following;

    The Source of CBD

    CBD can be derived from hemp and cannabis plants. The Food and Drug Administration emphasizes hemp CBD since the plant contains more CBD than cannabis, which leads to the THC amounts. CBD derived from hemp is considered safer for use; however, this differs based on your state.

    The Extraction Method

    CBD can be extracted from the plant using alcohol and CO2. According to Rochfort et al. (2020), CBD extracted by CO2 is considered the best since the compound is not exposed to harsh chemicals and substances which can contaminate the product, reducing its quality.

    Third-Party Testing

    The CBD you choose to make your DIY CBD soap should have undergone intensive independent third-party testing. This helps to know if the products are of good quality since you will know if the product is contaminated with any chemicals, including pesticides or heavy chemicals.

    You Know How Much and the Type of CBD to Use

    You are the manufacturer of CBD soap; thus, you can customize the amount and the ingredients you need to suit your preferences. The amount of CBD to use is a factor to consider since people react to CBD differently, and thus, if it's your first time making your own CBD soap, it might be hard to know the exact amount of CBD oil required. Trial and error can cause the method to work to find your right dosage.

    How to Make CBD Soap at Home

    You can make your own CBD soap using lye, which requires more precautions.

    Ingredients

    • Ten Oz (ounces) of coconut oil.
    • 5 Oz of cocoa butter.
    • 5 Oz shea butter.
    • Five ounces of castor oil.
    • 5 Oz of avocado oil.
    • 9 Oz of filters water.
    • 1 OZ of lye.
    • An ounce of lavender essential oil or any other of your choice.
    • Your desired CBD oil amount.

     Equipment

    • Soap mold.
    • Stainless steel pot and spoon.
    • Plastic spatula.
    • Hand mixer/ stick blender.
    • Old plastic container for lye.
    • Clean towel.
    • Protective gear such as gloves, goggles, and masks.

     Direction

    Combine coconut oil, cocoa butter, castor avocado, and CBD oil in a stainless pot. Allow the temperature to heat them together until they are melted. Mix them well using your tell spoon. With a thermometer, ensure the mixture heats to 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Add the filtered water to the plastic container and slowly pour the lye into it. Stir and heat the mixture to 95-100degrees.

    When all the mixtures are set, pour the lye water into the pot of oils and mix thoroughly with a hand mixer for 2-3minutes.

     Add your essential oil, stir the mixture properly, then with a spatula, scoop the mixture, and put it on the soap mold. Cover with the towel to insulate the soap for 24 hours.

    Conclusion

    CBD is an active chemical compound derived from hemp and cannabis plants. It is infused in many skin care products, including soaps. Unlike regular soaps, CBD soaps come with various benefits, such as reducing inflammation, improving sleep, relaxing the body and mind, and relieving various forms of pain. CBD soap can be made at home, which is advantageous because you can moderate and use ingredients that only suit your needs. Before choosing CBD for your soap recipe, you should consider the quality of the product by looking at the source of CBD and the third-party testing results.

    References

    Pamplona, F. A., Da Silva, L. R., & Coan, A. C. (2018). Potential clinical benefits of CBD-rich cannabis extracts over purified CBD in treatment-resistant epilepsy: observational data meta-analysis. Frontiers in neurology, 759.

    Rochfort, S., Isbel, A., Ezernieks, V., Elkins, A., Vincent, D., Deseo, M. A., & Spangenberg, G. C. (2020). Utilization of design of experiments approaches to optimize supercritical fluid extraction of medicinal cannabis. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 1-7.

    Überall, M. A. (2020). A review of scientific evidence for THC: CBD oromucosal spray (nabiximols) in chronic pain management. Journal of pain research, 13, 399

    Watt, G., & Karl, T. (2017). In vivo evidence for therapeutic properties of cannabidiol (CBD) for Alzheimer's disease. Frontiers in pharmacology, 8, 20.